Category: Gallery

Pictures from Production

With our (so far successful) Sailpower 2.0 KickStarter project underway, we have ramped up production. Here are a few pics about what goes on in our shop:

Mixing the rubber.

Mixing the rubber.

Mixing the rubber.

Mixing the rubber.

Pouring the rubber over the masters to make the molds.

Pouring the rubber over the masters to make the molds.

Molds for ship hulls and treasure chests.

Molds for ship hulls and treasure chests.

Ship hull molds.

Ship hull molds.

Lots of ship hulls.

Lots of ship hulls.

More hulls.

More hulls.

Finished cast hulls and small boats.

Finished cast hulls and small boats.

Hulls and treasure chests.

Hulls and treasure chests.

The New Sailpower 2.0 Book is Back from Editing!

The new Sailpower 2.0 book has come back from it’s second editing round (thanks Captain Allar!). Here are a few sample pages to show you whats in the new book.

And here is a side-by-side comparison between a page from the original book, and the revised version.

Page from original Sailpower book

Page from original Sailpower book

Page from new Sailpower 2.0 book

Page from new Sailpower 2.0 book

Sailpower 2.0 will be released at Origins in June. If you want to receive it earlier, get on board our KickStarter project. The project end May 4th.


Because it’s been requested, here are the same page samples from the black&white book.

Back from Gencon 2012

We had an awesome time at Gencon 2012, and we met lots, and lots of great people. Over the course of 4 days, we ran 30 hours of both TechCommander and Sailpower. Galleries of images from both games can be found on our Facebook pages (Sailpower, Techcommander).

And while most things went well at the convention, especially since we only had a skeleton crew at the show, we did have a few problems. Shortly after we got back, one of our Sailpower players made this post of his experience. Below is our response:

The folks at Sea Dog Game Studios wanted to take a moment to adress your review of our game.  We are in fact very much that “small business” referred to. Putting on a game of that size at Gencon is very hard work, and we are very disappointed that we did not get a chance to talk to you  after the game.  We don’t just make the rules, we also sculpted the ships you played with. We feel that these ships would be exciting in many games, including roleplaying, even if you did not care for our rules.   Additionally, we feel that you received a rather atypical game expierience due to a combination of: a scenario oversight, and perhaps the excessive rules lawyering of a couple of the players.

We try very hard to make sure everyone at our games has a good time.  That said, we allow for the players to play as they choose. Because of this, a certain amount of event chaos can occur. The session you attended suffered from a minor scenario oversight: we failed to assign any pirate hunters to the British or Dutch Royal Navies. Had we done this, you would have seen more combat and action at your end of the board.  This was noticed by staff, and corrected in later games.

Sailpower attempts to be a simple game to play. We find it is generally accessable to even a pre-teen gaming audience.   The rules that were provided are all things that can, and do, get used in the convention games. That said, Sailpower is not a simulation game.  Sailing ships, and the handling thereof, is a very complex topic, and hard to simplify.   We chose to try and make the system simple, yet with a lot of real world detail, that allows the player to get a feel of what it may have been like to be a captain.

However, in a convention setting we occasionally run across players who are looking for a more “sailing simulation” game.  In your game we had a player who intentionally rammed his ship into an opponents. The ramming rules do not come up often, and so the GM needed to review them to resolve the ram, and that slowed down the game.

At the end of the day, the rules will never completely please everyone, and even the best rules can be made to seem cumbersome if the scenario is not right.  We made Sailpower to appeal to a wide audience.  If it’s either too complex  or too simple for your paticular brand of high seas adventure, we hope you’ll consider our mininatures for whatever game you DO play.

Additionally if you like big boats without the complexities of cannon arcs or advanced movement I’d like to suggest our Cogs game.  The rules are free online and geared toward a very simple lighthearted fun game.